Past Present and Future of Apple Aperture

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I came across an article talking about the future of Apple Aperture, and how this may change the the editing process for photographers. Let me first say I personal have not used Apple for editing my images, I’ve always used Photoshop, and now I us Photoshop and Lightroom together. But let me give you a rundown of the future of Apple Aperture on what the article talked about.

The Past of Apple Aperture

Released in 2005, the original Apple Aperture changed the way many photographers worked. Although a shadow of its current incarnation, Aperture 1.0 combined non destructive image editing, built in RAW support and advanced image management to a digital world where previous workflows had often been complicated and time consuming. It was, the enabler for more photographers to switch to and use RAW files and was released over a year ahead of its rival Adobe’s Lightroom quickly gaining a solid user base of professional and enthusiast photographers alike.

First released in 2005, the initial Apple Aperture transformed the way in which many photographers worked. Even though a shadow of its current incarnation, Aperture 1.0 mixed non destructive image editing, built-in RAW support and superior image management to a digital world where earlier workflows had frequently been difficult and time-consuming. It was, the enabler for more photographers to switch to and use RAW files and was released over a year before its competitor Adobe’s Lightroom quickly gaining a solid user base of expert and enthusiast photographers alike.

Past Present and Future of Apple Aperture

Version 2.0 was launched in February 2008, bringing out more than ONE HUNDRED new features including some more innovative image tools to induce Photoshop users to switch. The edition two software was upgraded several times until Aperture 3.0 was released two years later. Boasting more than TWO HUNDRED new features, many introduced to counter the developing abilities of Adobe Lightroom, it appeared that Apple was devoted to support professional photographers with their software.

Apple Aperture 3 experienced several, fairly small up-dates in its first two years then the up-dates started to tail off. Many photographers worried by a insufficient progress with Aperture began to move to Lightroom and some of the additional image management programs that had, at this time stage, arrived on the market. Around the 27th June 2014, Apple formally announced that it would no longer develop Aperture.

The Present of Apple Aperture

Apple Aperture is not going to abruptly stop working, and indeed Apple have affirmed that they will include an update to make sure compatibility with its brand new OPERATING SYSTEM, Yosemite, due in the fall months. Also worth noting is that in contrast to Lightroom, which depends on Adobe’s Raw processing, Aperture makes use of OSX’s built-in RAW processing capabilities that are updated to incorporate new cameras and raw formats on a regular if not frequent basis. This will likely continue to expand the life span of Aperture long into the future, assuming you do not upgrade further than Yosemite. On the other hand, if you want to upgrade your OPERATING SYSTEM in a few years time to Yosemite’s successor, there is absolutely no guarantee that Aperture will work.

Past Present and Future of Apple Aperture

Many photographers will probably move their collections to alternative software over the following couple of months, for the most part this is likely to be Lightroom and indeed Adobe have announced that they will design and style a workflow making it easier for Aperture users to migrate to their software. The main element interest here is how well this migration will work with Aperture’s managed libraries, the workflow from a reference library being fairly easy.

The Future of Apple Aperture

For the instant, Adobe appears firmly devoted to Lightroom and it has become the to go app for many photographers. They have openly stated that they will not make Lightroom a solely rentable app even though it is currently available as part of the Creative Cloud photographers bundle along with Photoshop CC. The price of this particular package has been lowered to $9.99 per month, which makes it a lot more affordable to the enthusiast photographer.

Past Present and Future of Apple Aperture

Other options include Phase One’s recently announced Media Pro 1, ACDSee Pro 7, Corel Aftershot Pro 2 and the open source but very powerful Darktable.

Aperture is formally being wiped out. It absolutely transformed the way in which photographers worked with their images in an exceedingly positive way, but time continues on, and unlike its release in 2005 there are numerous equivalent alternate options to select from.

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